Main Categories

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Dec 20, 2022
View moreView less
 

1.1
This Standard applies to single- and multi-conductor Type TECK 90 armoured cable intended for installation in accordance with the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, on systems having nominal voltages of 5000 V and less and having a maximum temperature rating of 90 °C in both dry and wet locations.

1.2
In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Categories: Energy
Contact: [email protected] (Cherie Zou)
Origin: CSA
Close date: Dec 20, 2022
View moreView less
 

The scope of this Commentary parallels the scope of each Standard addressed. It covers all of the CSA N287 series Standards, as shown in Clause 1.2 below.

This Commentary refers to sources of material that were used during the formulation of some of the requirements in these Standards and may include:

i) concrete construction industry practice or experience;

ii) engineering or safety analysis;

iii) research or test programs;

iv) nuclear plant Operating Experience (OPEX); and

v) good engineering judgment.

Within the various CSA N287 committees, minutes of technical committee meetings and Requests for interpretation (RFI) have also been surveyed to identify topics that merit coverage in this document.

The development of each Standard through significant changes in the various editions is part of the history as explained in this Commentary.

Categories: Energy
Contact: [email protected] (Cherie Zou)
Origin: CSA
Close date: Dec 20, 2022
View moreView less
 

Le domaine d’application de ce commentaire est calqué sur le domaine d’application de chaque norme abordée. Il aborde l’ensemble des normes de la série CSA N287, conformément à l’article 1.2 ci-dessous.

Ce commentaire indique des sources de renseignements qui ont été utilisées durant la formulation de certaines des exigences dans ces normes et qui peuvent inclure :

i) des pratiques ou de l’expérience de l’industrie en matière de constructions en béton;

ii) des analyses techniques ou de la sûreté;

iii) des programmes de recherche ou d’essai;

iv) de l’expérience d’exploitation (OPEX) de centrales nucléaires;

v) un bon jugement d’ingénierie.

Au sein des divers comités de CSA N287, les procès-verbaux de certaines réunions de comités techniques et des demandes d’interprétation ont également été consultés pour cerner les sujets méritant d’être abordés dans ce document.

L’élaboration de chaque norme au moyen de changements importants dans les diverses éditions s’inscrit dans l’historique, comme il est expliqué dans ce commentaire.

Categories: Energy
Contact: [email protected] (Zain Jafri)
Origin: CSA
Close date: Dec 20, 2022
View moreView less
 

1.1 Type of consequence assessments

This Standard proposes methods for modelling the consequences of accidents at nuclear reactors for safety assessment and real-time emergency response.

Notes:

1)     Models used to assess the consequences of a postulated accident for safety assessment purposes have much in common with those used for a real-time nuclear accident for emergency response purposes, including the calculation of dispersion and air concentrations. However, the two types of models differ in their treatment of source terms and end points.

2) Safety assessment is a prospective activity that includes

a)      deterministic and probabilistic calculations carried out for Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) requirements;

b)      probabilistic risk assessment for cost-benefit analyses; and

c)      deterministic and probabilistic calculations carried out for emergency planning purposes.

3)     Emergency response consequence assessment is carried out during a real emergency in support of the protection of the public and the environment. Emergency planning consequence assessment is performed for postulated accidents in support of preparedness activities such as locating reception centres for evacuees and training emergency responders.

4)     All nuclear accident plant states are included within the scope of this Standard. (Refer to REGDOC 2.5.2.)

1.2 Facilities

This Standard is designed to provide guidance on how to model the consequences of accidental radiological releases to the atmosphere from nuclear reactor facilities.

When using this Standard with facilities other than nuclear reactors, the user is instructed to exercise caution. In these cases, the user of the Standard is responsible for determining its applicability.

Note: The range of distances discussed in Clause 1.5 might not be appropriate for small nuclear reactors and thus, it is the user’s responsibility to identify models that would be applicable at less than 300 m.

1.3 Operating conditions

This Standard is applicable when nuclear material is released to the atmospheric environment as a result of an accident at a nuclear reactor, subject to the exclusions of Clause 1.10.

Parts of this Standard may be applicable to the consequence assessment of the airborne emissions from anticipated operational occurrences (AOO). In these cases, the user is responsible for determining the applicability of this Standard.

1.4 Time scale

This Standard applies to short-term accidental releases from a nuclear reactor with a duration of a month or less.

Note: Methods of estimating doses for release durations beyond 30 days are beyond the scope of this Standard, but are addressed by other guidance such as that provided in CSA N288.1.

1.5 Spatial scale

This Standard covers local atmospheric dispersion, which for Gaussian plume models is defined as dispersion that occurs in the range of 300 m to 100 km.

Notes:

1)     The lower limit was set at 300 m since specialized models are required for closer distances and members of the public rarely reside closer than this. Further downwind, the predictions of the local dispersion models discussed in this Standard are fairly reliable to distances of 20 km. Uncertainties become larger as the distance increases and the local dispersion models become unreliable for individual dose calculations beyond 50 km (see Clause 7.2.6). For individual dose calculations beyond 50 km, see Clause 4.6.4.

2)     Emergency response applications can require the range of validity to extend to 50 km despite the reduced accuracy. The accuracy of the Gaussian model limits its application for calculation of individual dose to distances less than 50 km. While confidence in model predictions decreases with increasing distance, if detailed meteorological data required to drive sophisticated air dispersion models are not available, the use of Gaussian Plume model is justified. Furthermore, the use of Gaussian models is acceptable when calculating the collective dose, because for such aggregate quantities, the errors tend to cancel. The model’s applicability to 100 km covers the need to calculate collective doses incorporating the major urban areas in the vicinity. Doses beyond 100 km make a relatively small contribution to collective doses (see Clause 7.14.2).

3)     The user is responsible for interpreting the individual dose in the case of airborne releases from a site with multiple reactor units.

4)     At distances greater than this scale, advanced models might be used with appreciation for the limitations of the model being considered.

1.6 Meteorological sampling

This Standard covers both

a) single weather scenario approaches (deterministic calculations); and

b) probabilistic sampling of meteorological data records.

1.7 Pathways

Models for the dispersion (transport and diffusion) and fate of radioactive contaminants released to the atmosphere are covered in this Standard. This Standard includes pathways for immersion in the airborne plume (cloudshine), external exposure to contaminated ground (groundshine), and inhalation. Absorption of tritiated water (HTO) vapour through the skin is included in the inhalation pathway.

Note: The ingestion pathway might not be relevant to the time scale covered in this Standard.

1.8 Contaminants

This Standard covers airborne radioactive contaminants that could be released accidentally from nuclear reactors in the form of gases, particles, and water vapour.

1.9 Receptors and end points

This Standard applies to receptors (see Clause 7.2) and end points (see Clause 7.4) that can be affected by radiological contaminants released from a nuclear facility. The calculation of the following quantities is part of this Standard:

a)     air and ground concentration of contaminants; and

b)     the doses and health effects in representative persons (including workers located more than 300 m from the release and members of the public).

1.10 Exclusions

1.10.1 Routine releases during normal operation

This Standard does not address emissions that occur as a result of normal operation of a nuclear facility, which are addressed in a separate Standard (CSA N288.1). The models and assumptions are different when a release is spread over many years, when it is of small magnitude, and when humans remain in the vicinity of the source, carrying out their normal activities.

1.10.2 Spills and liquid releases

This Standard does not address spills and accidental release of radioactive contaminants to surface or ground water. However, air emissions arising from such a spill are considered, as depletion of airborne radioactivity by deposition to water is included in the Standard if there is a water body between the source and the receptor, but surface water transport is not included.

1.10.3 Urban dispersion

Most urban dispersion effects (street canyon, differential heating of street walls, etc.) are beyond the scope of this Standard. Enhanced dilution due to the large surface roughness length of urban areas may be taken into account in calculating the vertical dispersion parameter (e.g., see Clause B.1.12).

1.10.4 Fire and explosions

This Standard does not apply to the release of radioactive material coincident with and caused by fire or explosion. This Standard does not deal with special applications such as malevolent acts.

1.10.5 Hurricanes and tornados

Severe weather conditions such as hurricanes and tornadoes are not addressed in this Standard. The rationale for excluding these scenarios is that they are associated with high winds and complex wind fields that result in enhanced dispersion and lower concentrations relative to more normal weather conditions.

1.10.6 Regional and global dispersion

Regional (or mesoscale) and global dispersion are excluded since consequences are expected to be very low beyond 100 km.  This Standard focuses on local dispersion (distances less than 100 km).

1.10.7 Chemical contaminants

This Standard does not apply to non-radioactive contaminants or toxicity due to radionuclides. This Standard does therefore not address extreme concentrations as end points or atmospheric chemistry.

Note: Examples of non-radioactive contaminants include toxic, corrosive, or environmentally deleterious substances.

1.10.8 Ingestion pathway

The ingestion pathway is not covered by this Standard.

1.10.9 Economic costs including those arising from off-site interventions

This Standard does not address those economic consequences, such as those arising from evacuation, food replacement, and eventual remediation, associated with a nuclear accident from a nuclear reactor facility. The simulation of protective actions such as evacuation and sheltering of the population during an emergency is not covered in this Standard, but the dose reduction factor associated with indoor occupancy after an accident can be included.

1.10.10 Logistics of protective actions

Although this Standard covers the calculation of doses for emergency planning purposes, it does not include the assessment of the logistics of protective actions for the public.

1.10.11 Non-human biota

Doses and effects on non-human biota are not covered by this Standard.

Note: See CSA N288.6 for dose and effects on non-human biota during normal operations.

1.11 Terminology

In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Categories: Energy
Contact: [email protected] (Zain Jafri)
Origin: CSA
Close date: Dec 20, 2022
View moreView less
 

1.1 Types d’évaluation des conséquences

Cette norme propose des méthodes pour la modélisation des conséquences des accidents liés aux réacteurs nucléaires pour l’évaluation de la sûreté et les interventions en temps réel en cas d’urgence.

Notes :

1) Les modèles utilisés pour évaluer les conséquences d’un accident postulé aux fins d’évaluation de la sûreté sont très semblables à ceux utilisés pour les conséquences d’un accident nucléaire en temps réel aux fins d’intervention en cas d’urgence, y compris le calcul de la dispersion et des concentrations atmosphériques. Toutefois, les deux types de modèles ne traitent pas les termes sources et les paramètres ultimes de la même manière.

2) L’évaluation de la sûreté est une activité prospective qui comprend :

a) les calculs déterministes et probabilistes effectués aux fins de satisfaire aux exigences de l’autorité compétente (AC);

b) l’évaluation probabiliste du risque dans le cadre d’analyses coûts-bénéfices; et

c) les calculs déterministes et probabilistes effectués aux fins de la planification des mesures d’urgence.

3) L’évaluation des conséquences de l’intervention en cas d’urgence est effectuée pendant une urgence réelle pour confirmer la protection du public et de l’environnement. L’évaluation des conséquences de l’intervention en cas d’urgence est effectuée pour les accidents postulés pour appuyer les activités de préparation comme l’implantation de centres d’accueil des évacués et la formation des intervenants d’urgence.

4) Tous les états d’accidents nucléaires d’une centrale sont couverts par le champ d’application de cette norme (voir REGDOC-2.5.2).

1.2 Installations

Cette norme a pour objet de renseigner sur la façon de modéliser les conséquences radiologiques des rejets accidentels dans l’atmosphère provenant d’un réacteur nucléaire.

Lorsque cette norme est utilisée pour des installations autres que des réacteurs nucléaires, l’utilisateur est invité à faire preuve de prudence, car il est responsable de déterminer si la norme est pertinente à sa situation.

Note : La gamme des distances indiquées à l’article 1.5 pourrait ne pas convenir aux petits réacteurs nucléaires et par conséquent, il incombe à l’utilisateur de déterminer les modèles qui seraient pertinents à moins de 300 m.

1.3 Conditions de fonctionnement

Cette norme s’applique lorsque des matières nucléaires sont rejetées dans l’atmosphère par suite d’un accident de réacteur nucléaire, sous réserve des exclusions de l’article 1.10.

Des parties de cette norme peuvent s’appliquer à l’évaluation des conséquences des émissions dans l’atmosphère découlant des incidents de fonctionnement prévus (IFP). Dans ces cas, il incombe à l’utilisateur de déterminer la pertinence de cette norme.

1.4 Échelle de temps

Cette norme s’applique aux rejets accidentels de courte durée (moins d’un mois) d’un réacteur nucléaire.

Note : Les méthodes permettant d’estimer les doses lors de périodes de rejets d’une durée supérieure à 30 jours sont au-delà du domaine d’application de cette norme, mais relèvent d’autres documents, comme CSA N288.1.

1.5 Échelle spatiale

Cette norme concerne la dispersion atmosphérique locale, qui pour les modèles gaussiens des panaches est définie comme la dispersion qui se produit entre 300 m et 100 km.

Notes :

1) La limite inférieure a été établie à 300 m parce que des modèles spécialisés sont nécessaires pour des distances inférieures et que personne ne vit aussi près d’une centrale. En outre, les prévisions des modèles de dispersion locale présentées dans cette norme sont relativement fiables jusqu’à une distance de 20 km. Les incertitudes augmentent à mesure que la distance augmente et les modèles de dispersion locale ne sont plus fiables pour les calculs de dose individuelle au-delà de 50 km (voir l’article 7.2.6). Pour les calculs de dose individuelle au-delà de 50 km, voir l’article 4.6.4.

2) Les interventions en cas d’urgence pourraient nécessiter d’élargir la gamme de validité à 50 km malgré la perte de précision. La précision du modèle gaussien limite son application au calcul d’une dose individuelle pour des distances inférieures à 50 km. Bien que la confiance dans les prévisions du modèle diminue avec l’augmentation de la distance, si les données météorologiques détaillées exigées pour conduire des modèles sophistiqués de dispersion de l’air ne sont pas disponibles, l’utilisation d’un modèle de panache gaussien est justifiée. De plus, l’utilisation de modèles gaussiens est acceptable pour calculer la dose collective, car sur de telles quantités agrégées, les erreurs ont tendance à s’annuler. La pertinence du modèle jusqu’à 100 km permet de calculer les doses collectives englobant les principaux centres urbains à proximité. Au-delà de 100 km, les doses ne contribuent que faiblement à la dose collective (voir l’article 7.14.2).

3) L’utilisateur est responsable d’interpréter la dose individuelle en cas de rejet aérien d’une installation à plusieurs réacteurs.

4) Pour les distances supérieures à cette échelle, il serait possible d’utiliser des modèles perfectionnés tout en tenant compte des limites du modèle retenu.

1.6 Échantillonnage météorologique

Cette norme vise :

a) le scénario météorologique unique (calculs déterministes); et

b) l’échantillonnage probabiliste des registres des données météorologiques.

1.7 Voies

Les modèles de dispersion (transport et diffusion) et le devenir des contaminants radioactifs libérés dans l’atmosphère sont visés par cette norme. Cette norme traite également des voies d’immersion dans le panache en suspension dans l’air (irradiation provenant du panache), de l’exposition externe au sol contaminé (provenant du sol), et de l’inhalation. L’absorption par voie cutanée de la vapeur d’eau tritiée (HTO) est comprise dans la voie d’inhalation.

Note : Les voies d’ingestion pourraient ne pas être pertinentes pour l’échelle de temps couvertes dans cette norme.

1.8 Contaminants

Cette norme vise les contaminants radioactifs en suspension dans l’air qui pourraient être rejetés accidentellement par les réacteurs nucléaires sous la forme de gaz, de particules et de vapeur d’eau.

1.9 Récepteurs et paramètres ultimes

Cette norme vise les récepteurs (voir l’article 7.2) et les paramètres ultimes (voir l’article 7.4) qui pourraient être touchés par les contaminants radioactifs rejetés par une installation nucléaire. Le calcul des quantités qui suivent fait partie de cette norme :

a) la concentration de contaminants dans l’air et dans le sol; et

b) les doses reçues et leurs effets sur la santé des personnes représentatives (y compris les travailleurs et la population se trouvant à plus de 300 m du rejet).

1.10 Exclusions

1.10.1 Rejets réguliers en exploitation normale

Cette norme ne traite pas des émissions qui se produisent dans le cadre normal de l’exploitation d’une installation nucléaire; ces émissions font l’objet d’une autre norme, soit CSA N288.1. Les modèles et les hypothèses diffèrent lorsqu’un rejet s’étend sur de nombreuses années, qu’il est de magnitude relativement faible, et que des humains demeurent à proximité de la source et vaquent à leurs activités normales.

1.10.2 Déversement et rejets liquides

Cette norme ne traite pas des déversements ni des rejets accidentels de contaminants radioactifs dans l’eau de surface ou souterraine. Toutefois, les émissions aériennes générées par un tel déversement sont considérées, puisque l’épuisement des rejets radioactifs par déposition dans l’eau est traité dans cette norme, lorsqu’il y a un plan d’eau entre la source et le récepteur. Par contre, le transport des eaux de surface est exclu.

1.10.3 Dispersion en milieu urbain

La plupart des effets de la dispersion en milieu urbain (canyon urbain, réchauffement différentiel des murs, etc.) sont au-delà du domaine d’application de cette norme. Une dilution plus importante attribuable à la rugosité des grandes surfaces des milieux urbains peut être prise en compte dans le calcul des paramètres de dispersion verticale (p. ex., voir l’article B.1.12).

1.10.4 Incendies et explosions

Cette norme ne traite pas des rejets de matières radioactives coïncidents avec et attribuables à des incendies ou des explosions. Cette norme ne traite pas des applications spéciales comme les actes malveillants.

1.10.5 Ouragans et tornades

Les conditions météorologiques violentes comme les ouragans et les tornades ne sont pas visées par cette norme. Ces conditions sont exclues parce qu’elles sont associées à des vents forts et à des champs de vent complexes qui entraînent une dispersion accrue et des concentrations plus faibles que par conditions météorologiques normales.

1.10.6 Dispersions régionales et globales

Les dispersions régionales (méso-échelle) et globales sont exclues car il faut s’attendre à ce que les conséquences soient négligeables au-delà de 100 km. Cette norme met l’accent sur la dispersion locale (distances inférieures à 100 km).

1.10.7 Contaminants chimiques

Cette norme ne traite pas des contaminants non radioactifs ni de la toxicité attribuable aux radionucléides. Cette norme ne traite par conséquent pas des concentrations extrêmes comme paramètres ultimes ni de la chimie atmosphérique.

Note : Les substances toxiques, corrosives ou nuisibles pour l’environnement sont des exemples de contaminants non radioactifs.

1.10.8 Voies d’ingestion

Les voies d’ingestion ne sont pas visées par cette norme.

1.10.9 Coûts incluant celui des interventions hors site

Cette norme ne traite pas des conséquences économiques, comme le coût de l’évacuation, du remplacement de la nourriture et de la remise en état éventuelle, associées à un accident nucléaire se produisant dans un réacteur nucléaire. La simulation des mesures de protection comme l’évacuation et la mise à l’abri de la population en cas d’urgence n’est pas visée par cette norme, mais le facteur de réduction de dose associé à l’occupation après un accident pourrait être pris en compte.

1.10.10 Logistique des mesures de protection

Bien que cette norme traite du calcul des doses pour la planification des mesures d’urgence, elle ne vise pas l’évaluation de la logistique des mesures de protection du public.

1.10.11 Biote non humain

Les doses et leurs effets sur le biote non humain ne sont pas visés par cette norme.

Note : Voir CSA N288.6 pour la dose et les effets sur le biote non humain pendant l’exploitation normale.

1.11 Terminologie

Dans cette norme, le terme « doit » indique une exigence, c’est-à-dire une prescription que l’utilisateur doit respecter pour assurer la conformité à la norme; « devrait » indique une recommandation ou ce qu’il est conseillé mais non obligatoire de faire; et « peut » indique une possibilité ou ce qu’il est permis de faire.

Les notes qui accompagnent les articles ne comprennent pas de prescriptions ni de recommandations. Elles servent à séparer du texte les explications ou les renseignements qui ne font pas proprement partie de la norme.

Les notes au bas des figures et des tableaux font partie de ceux-ci et peuvent être rédigées comme des prescriptions.

Les annexes sont qualifiées de normatives (obligatoires) ou d’informatives (facultatives) pour en préciser l’application.

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Dec 31, 2022
View moreView less
 

1.1.1 This Standard applies to service-entrance, feeder, and branch-circuit busways and associated fittings rated at 600 1000 V or less, 6 000 A or less, and intended for use in accordance with the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I (CE Code, Part I), the National Electrical Code (NEC), NFPA 70, and the Mexican Standard for Electrical Installations (Utility), NOM- 001-SEDE, (see Annex B, Reference Item No. 1).  These requirements do not apply to metal enclosed bus intended for connecting switchgear assemblies for use in prefabricated electric distribution systems.

1.1.2 For the purpose of these requirements, a busway is considered to be a grounded metal enclosure containing factory mounted conductors that are usually copper or aluminum bars, rods, or tubes.

1.1.3 Values stated without parentheses are the requirement.  Values in parentheses are explanatory or approximate information.

1.1.4 Unless otherwise indicated, all voltage and current values mentioned in this Standard are root-mean-square (rms).

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 1, 2023
View moreView less
 

This Standard applies to cast aluminium alloy enclosures pressurized with dry air, inert gases, eg. sulphur hexafluoride, carbon tetrafluoride, or nitrogen or a mixture of such gases, used in indoor or outdoor installations of high-voltage switchgear and controlgear, where the gas is used principally for its dielectric and/or arc-quenching properties, with rated voltages

(1) 1 kV and up to and including 52 kV and with gas-filled compartments with design pressure greater than 3 bar (gauge); and

(2) 72.5 kV and above.

The enclosures comprise parts of electrical equipment not necessarily limited to the following examples:

- Circuit-breakers
- Switch-disconnectors
- Disconnectors
- Earthing switches
- Current transformers
- Voltage transformers
- Surge arresters
- Busbars and connections

The scope also covers pressurized components such as the centre chamber of live tank switchgear, gas-insulated current transformers, etc.

Canadian Deviations are included in this Standard.

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 1, 2023
View moreView less
 

IEC 62841-1:2014, Clause 1 is applicable, except as follows. 
Addition: 
This document applies to band saws intended for cutting wood and analogous materials, 
plastics and metals, except magnesium. 
This document does not apply to transportable scroll saws and jig saws with a reciprocating blade. 
This document does not apply to:  
– hand-held band saws; 
– non-vertical saws; and 
– wire saws. 

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 1, 2023
View moreView less
 

This clause of Part 1 is applicable, except as follows

Addition:

This document applies to grass shears with a maximum cutting width of 200 mm designed primarily
for cutting grass.

This document does not apply to hedoe trimmers.

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 4, 2023
View moreView less
 

1.1
This Standard applies to cord-connected and permanently connected electrically heated commercial cooking appliances for use on nominal system voltages of 600 V and less, that are intended to be used in accordance with CSA C22.1, Canadian Electrical Code, Part I.

1.2
This Standard applies to electric ranges, ovens, broilers, fry kettles, griddles, sandwich toasters, toasters, food warmers, coffee stoves, urns, hotplates, popcorn machines, liquid heaters, pressure cookers*, utensil warmers, and similar appliances.

* Pressure vessels that may operate at pressures of 103 kPa and greater are subject to inspection by pressure vessel inspection authorities.

1.3
This Standard applies to food cooking and warming appliances for use in non-hazardous locations in commercial establishments.

1.4
This Standard does not apply to electrical equipment on coal- or gas-heated cooking equipment or to appliances employing high-frequency currents.

1.5
In this Standard, shall is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the Standard; should is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and may is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 6, 2023
View moreView less
 

1.1 This standard covers finished-grade in-ground outlet boxes with integral wiring enclosures for mounting accessible wiring device(s) connected to branch circuit(s). An in-ground box is intended to be installed in accordance with;

a) NFPA 70, National Electrical Code,
b) CSA C22.1, Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, Safety Standard for Electrical Installations,
c) Mexico’s Electrical Installations, NOM-001-SEDE. In-ground outlet boxes may also accommodate telecommunication-circuit accessories for power-limited circuits.

1.2 This standard covers the requirements for in-ground outlet boxes that are intended to provide drainage for devices and accessories mounted within, for pedestrian traffic only or pedestrian traffic and nondeliberate vehicular traffic.

1.3 This standard does not cover

a) Boxes for use in hazardous (classified) locations as defined in the NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, CSA C22.1, Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, Safety Standard for Electrical Installations and NOM-001-SEDE Mexico’s Electrical Installations.
b) Junction boxes for Swimming Pools covered by UL 1241 and CSA C22.2 No. 89
c) Commercial Appliance Outlet Centers covered by ANSI/UL 891/CSA C22.2 No. 244 and ANCE NMX-J-118/2-ANCE.
D) Products covered by UL 486D/CSA C22.2 No. 198.2 and ANCE NMX-J-519-ANCE, Sealed Wired Connectors
e) Boxes used for infrastructure lighting and traffic lighting, and handhole and manhole boxes and enclosures intended solely for electrical installation and maintenance access.
f) Concrete boxes
g) In-ground outlet boxes greater than Tier 5 in accordance with ANSI/SCTE 77 Specification for Underground Enclosure Integrity.
h) Grade-level in-ground enclosures covered by CSA C22.2 No. 344

Categories: Energy
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 7, 2023
View moreView less
 

This standard describes the procedures to be followed and the precautions to be taken in measuring performance of LED drivers commonly used in general lighting, exterior lighting, and roadway lighting, and similar applications. The scope includes LED drivers that may have these characteristics:

 

Input supply voltage up to 600 VDC or 600 VAC (60 or 50/60 Hz)

Output open-circuit voltage of 600 V or less

Constant-current or constant-voltage direct current (DC) output

Fixed, pulse-width modulation, or programmable (tunable or dimmable) output power

External (standalone) or internal (enclosed in luminaire)

Categories: Energy
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 7, 2023
View moreView less
 

This standard provides specifications for and operating characteristics of non-integral electronic drivers (power supplies) for LED devices, arrays, or systems intended for general lighting applications, including indoor and outdoor, as well as specific cases such as Power over the Ethernet (PoE), and Luminaires or Lighting systems assembled with two or more LED drivers, and in the future may include other devices such as Light Fidelity (LiFi) or Visual Light Communication (VLC). Electronic drivers are devices that use semiconductors to control and supply DC power for LED starting and operation. The drivers operate from supply sources up to 600 V AC or DC at a frequency up to 60 Hertz.

Categories: Electrical
Origin: CSA
Close date: Jan 21, 2023
View moreView less
 

Replacement:

This International Standard applies to the BASIC SAFETY and ESSENTIAL PERFORMANCE of INFANT TRANSPORT INCUBATOR equipment, as defined in 201.3.211 of this standard, also referred to as ME EQUIPMENT.

If a clause or subclause is specifically intended to be applicable to ME EQUIPMENT only, or to ME SYSTEMS only, the title and content of that clause or subclause will say so. If that is not the case, the clause or subclause applies both to ME EQUIPMENT and to ME SYSTEMS, as relevant.

HAZARDS inherent in the intended physiological function of ME EQUIPMENT or ME SYSTEMS within the scope of this standard are not covered by specific requirements in this standard except in 7.2.13 and 8.4.1 of the general standard.

NOTE See also 4.2 of the general standard.

This particular standard specifies safety requirements for INFANT TRANSPORT INCUBATORS but alternate methods of compliance with a specific clause by demonstrating equivalent safety will not be judged as non compliant if the MANUFACTURER has demonstrated in his RISK MANAGEMENT FILE that the RISK presented by the HAZARD has been found to be of an acceptable level when weighed against the benefit of treatment from the device.

This particular standard does not apply to:

- devices supplying heat via BLANKETS, PADS or MATTRESSES in medical use; for information see IEC 80601-2-35 [1]1);
- INFANT INCUBATORS which are not INFANT TRANSPORT INCUBATOR; for information see IEC 60601-2-19 [2];
- INFANT RADIANT WARMERS; for information, see IEC 60601-2-21 [3];
- INFANT PHOTOTHERAPY; for information, see IEC 60601-2-50 [4].